we fail to reject the null hypothesis

If the p-value is HIGHER than than our predetermined value, we fail to reject the null-hypothesis.

We would fail to reject the hypothesis if the ..

But we cannot accept failure to reject the null hypothesis null hypothesis testing, the null Why We Don’t “Accept” the Null Hypothesis by Keith M.

This is the critical value that we need if we want to reject the null hypothesis.

we will fail to reject the null-hypothesis as our test ..

Here are three experiments to illustrate when the different approaches to statistics are appropriate. In the first experiment, you are testing a plant extract on rabbits to see if it will lower their blood pressure. You already know that the plant extract is a diuretic (makes the rabbits pee more) and you already know that diuretics tend to lower blood pressure, so you think there's a good chance it will work. If it does work, you'll do more low-cost animal tests on it before you do expensive, potentially risky human trials. Your prior expectation is that the null hypothesis (that the plant extract has no effect) has a good chance of being false, and the cost of a false positive is fairly low. So you should do frequentist hypothesis testing, with a significance level of 0.05.

Now instead of testing 1000 plant extracts, imagine that you are testing just one. If you are testing it to see if it kills beetle larvae, you know (based on everything you know about plant and beetle biology) there's a pretty good chance it will work, so you can be pretty sure that a P value less than 0.05 is a true positive. But if you are testing that one plant extract to see if it grows hair, which you know is very unlikely (based on everything you know about plants and hair), a P value less than 0.05 is almost certainly a false positive. In other words, if you expect that the null hypothesis is probably true, a statistically significant result is probably a false positive. This is sad; the most exciting, amazing, unexpected results in your experiments are probably just your data trying to make you jump to ridiculous conclusions. You should require a much lower P value to reject a null hypothesis that you think is probably true.


Name: Ian Wardell • Monday, September 15, 2014

Sample question: A researcher claims that Democrats will win the next election. 4300 voters were polled; 2200 said they would vote Democrat. Decide if you should support or reject null hypothesis. Is there enough evidence at α=0.05 to support this claim?

Support or Reject Null Hypothesis in Easy Steps

Sometimes, you’ll be given a proportion of the population or a percentage and asked to support or reject null hypothesis. In this case you can’t compute a test value by calculating a (you need actual numbers for that), so we use a slightly different technique.

Null and Alternative Hypothesis | Real Statistics Using Excel

Compare your answer from step 4 with the α value given in the question. Should you support or reject the null hypothesis?
If step 7 is less than or equal to α, reject the null hypothesis, otherwise do not reject it.

Significance Tests / Hypothesis Testing - Jerry Dallal

The distinction between “acceptance” and “failure to reject” is bestStats - What Does "Fail to Reject the Null Hypothesis Stats - What Does "Fail to Reject the Null Hypothesis" Mean, Why we don't accept the Null Hypothesis Video - Duration: 4:00.

Significance Tests / Hypothesis Testing

The significance level (also known as the "critical value" or "alpha") you should use depends on the costs of different kinds of errors. With a significance level of 0.05, you have a 5% chance of rejecting the null hypothesis, even if it is true. If you try 100 different treatments on your chickens, and none of them really change the sex ratio, 5% of your experiments will give you data that are significantly different from a 1:1 sex ratio, just by chance. In other words, 5% of your experiments will give you a false positive. If you use a higher significance level than the conventional 0.05, such as 0.10, you will increase your chance of a false positive to 0.10 (therefore increasing your chance of an embarrassingly wrong conclusion), but you will also decrease your chance of a false negative (increasing your chance of detecting a subtle effect). If you use a lower significance level than the conventional 0.05, such as 0.01, you decrease your chance of an embarrassing false positive, but you also make it less likely that you'll detect a real deviation from the null hypothesis if there is one.