How to Set Up a Hypothesis Test: Null versus Alternative

Click the link the skip to the situation you need to support or reject null hypothesis for:

Null Hypothesis (1 of 4) - David Lane

Another way your data can fool you is when you don't reject the null hypothesis, even though it's not true. If the true proportion of female chicks is 51%, the null hypothesis of a 50% proportion is not true, but you're unlikely to get a significant difference from the null hypothesis unless you have a huge sample size. Failing to reject the null hypothesis, even though it's not true, is a "false negative" or "Type II error." This is why we never say that our data shows the null hypothesis to be true; all we can say is that we haven't rejected the null hypothesis.

Broken down into English, that’s H0 (The null hypothesis): μ (the average) = (is equal to) 8.2

The null hypothesis is an hypothesis about a population parameter

State what will happen if the experiment doesn’t make any difference. That’s the null hypothesis–that nothing will happen. In this experiment, if nothing happens, then the recovery time will stay at 8.2 weeks.

Looking at the California Health Interview Survey data, I came up with the following null hypothesis:

In the olden days, when people looked up P values in printed tables, they would report the results of a statistical test as "PPP>0.10", etc. Nowadays, almost all computer statistics programs give the exact P value resulting from a statistical test, such as P=0.029, and that's what you should report in your publications. You will conclude that the results are either significant or they're not significant; they either reject the null hypothesis (if P is below your pre-determined significance level) or don't reject the null hypothesis (if P is above your significance level). But other people will want to know if your results are "strongly" significant (P much less than 0.05), which will give them more confidence in your results than if they were "barely" significant (P=0.043, for example). In addition, other researchers will need the exact P value if they want to combine your results with others into a .


Welcome to the Journal of Articles in Support of the Null Hypothesis

Sample question: A researcher claims that more than 23% of community members go to church regularly. In a recent survey, 126 out of 420 people stated they went to church regularly. Is there enough evidence at α = 0.05 to support this claim? Use the P-Value method to support or reject null hypothesis.

Support or Reject Null Hypothesis in Easy Steps

This criticism only applies to two-tailed tests, where the null hypothesis is "Things are exactly the same" and the alternative is "Things are different." Presumably these critics think it would be okay to do a one-tailed test with a null hypothesis like "Foot length of male chickens is the same as, or less than, that of females," because the null hypothesis that male chickens have smaller feet than females could be true. So if you're worried about this issue, you could think of a two-tailed test, where the null hypothesis is that things are the same, as shorthand for doing two one-tailed tests. A significant rejection of the null hypothesis in a two-tailed test would then be the equivalent of rejecting one of the two one-tailed null hypotheses.

Explainer: what is a null hypothesis? - The Conversation

Compare your answer from step 5 with the α value given in the question. Support or reject the null hypothesis? If step 5 is less than α, reject the null hypothesis, otherwise do not reject it. In this case, .582 (5.82%) is not less than our α, so we do not reject the null hypothesis.

Difference Between Null and Alternative Hypothesis

Figure out the . The alternate hypothesis is the opposite of the null hypothesis. In other words, what happens if our experiment makes a difference?