aluminium oxide nanoparticles synthesis by ball milling method

Synthesis of Magnesium Oxide Nanoparticles by Wet …

Synthesis of aluminum oxide scholarly search - …

In chemistry, many metal oxides are referred to by changing the “-ium” suffix of the metal to “-ia”. Thus, aluminum oxide is often called alumina, chromium oxide is often called chromia, zirconium oxide is often called zirconia, etc. METAL OXIDES ARE NOT METALS. This is a common misunderstanding among the general public and a frequent oversight in the media. Just as rust is a form of iron oxide (which doesn’t have a special name, incidentally) and is very different from iron metal, or how silica (glass) is very different from silicon (a semiconductor), metal oxides are chemically different from their parent metals.

GAS PHASE SYNTHESIS OF ALUMINUM AND CORE …

Zinc Oxide—From Synthesis to Application: A Review - MDPI

As mentioned, this technique is not limited to just chromium salts, and works with a wide variety of metal salts, preferably nitrates and chlorides. Alumina, titania, zirconia, hafnia, niobia, tantala, tungsten oxide, iron oxide, indium oxide, gallium oxide, and tin oxide aerogels can readily be prepared with this technique, to name a few. Using this technique, Drs. Jeffrey Long and Debra Rolison of the United States Naval Research Laboratory have demonstrated preparation of magnetic iron oxide aerogels.

Although Samuel Kistler is reported to have prepared aerogels of tin oxide in the 1930’s, the next metal oxide aerogels wouldn’t pop up until the 1980’s. These were the first alumina aerogels, first synthesized by Dr. Bulant Yoldas through the controlled hydrolysis of aluminum tri-sec-butoxide–a viscous, difficult-to-handle aluminum alkoxide with the consistency of honey. Suffice it to say this technique has its limitations and produced alumina aerogels of limited quality as a result. Aerogels of titania, zirconia, hafnia, vanadia, niobia, and tantala were eventually prepared using alkoxides as well, however unlike silica, good monolithicity and high optical transparency were hard to achieve in these aerogels.


Journal of Biomedical Nanotechnology

AB - Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F-, Cl-, and Br-in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu 2 Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent.

A Note About Metal Oxide Naming

N2 - Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F-, Cl-, and Br-in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu 2 Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent.

DOI: 10.1021/nl1034573 - American Chemical Society

Metallic aluminum (Al) is of interest as a reducing agent because of its low standard reduction potential. However, its surface is invariably covered with a dense aluminum oxide film, which prevents its effective use as a reducing agent in wet-chemical synthesis. Pitting corrosion, known as an undesired reaction destroying Al and is enhanced by anions such as F-, Cl-, and Br-in aqueous solutions, is applied here for the first time to activate Al as a reducing agent for wet-chemical synthesis of a diverse array of metals and alloys. Specifically, we demonstrate the synthesis of highly dispersed palladium nanoparticles on carbon black with stabilizers and the intermetallic Cu 2 Sb/C, which are promising candidates, respectively, for fuel cell catalysts and lithium-ion battery anodes. Atomic hydrogen, an intermediate during the pitting corrosion of Al in protonic solvents (e.g., water and ethylene glycol), is validated as the actual reducing agent.