Spondylolisthesis & Spondylolysis - treatment & …

Repetitive trauma in clinical onset or aggravation of Spondylolisthesis and/or Spondylolysis

Conditions of the Spine | Spondylosis and Spondylolisthesis

In Spondylolisthesis with a significant slip, a step-off at the lumbosacral junction is palpable, motion of the lumbar spine is restricted, and hamstring tightness is evident on straight leg raising. As the vertebral body displaces anteriorly, the individual assumes a lordotic posture above the level of the slip to compensate for the displacement. Adults may have objective signs of nerve root compression, such as motor weakness, reflex change, or sensory deficit. These signs are seldom seen in children.

Medical attention sought for the signs/symptoms, and X-rays conducted which demonstrate Spondylolisthesis and/or Spondylolysis.

the symptoms associated with spondylosis and spondylolisthesis

There may be no objective signs in Spondylolysis, or in first or second degree Spondylolisthesis. The finding of Spondylolysis on x-ray in an adult is likely to be incidental, and not the cause of back pain if that pain did not commence in childhood or adolescence. Tightened hamstrings are present in the majority of those who are symptomatic. Tenderness and spasms of the paravertebral muscles may be present at the level of the vertebral defect and surrounding segments. Pain may be induced and increased by certain movements.

In Spondylolysis, symptoms are often absent. Defects are then discovered only incidentally on x-ray made for other purposes. In Spondylolisthesis, injury may aggravate (permanently worsen) any symptoms, but rarely does a single injury cause symptoms in a person who previously had none. Symptoms generally begin insidiously during the second or third decade as an intermittent dull ache in the lower back, present with increasing frequency during walking and standing. Later, pain may develop in the buttocks and thighs, and still later unilateral sciatica may develop.


Symptoms include back and neck pain

The lytic (subtype a) results from the separation or dissolution of the pars. The incidence of this type of Spondylolisthesis increases from less than 1 percent in children 5 years of age to 4.5 percent in children 7 years of age. The remaining 0.8 to 1 percent increase occurs between the ages of 11 to 16 years, presumably because of stress fractures caused by athletic activity. Extension movements of the spine, with lateral flexion, can increase the shearing stress at the pars interarticularis and result in Spondylolysis.

Lumbar Spondylosis - Physiotherapy Treatment

Type I. Dysplastic: This type results from congenital abnormalities of the upper sacral facets or inferior facets of the fifth lumbar vertebra that allow slipping of L5 on S1. There is no pars interarticularis defect in this type. The sacrum is not strong enough to withstand the weight and stress. Thus, the pars and inferior facets of L5 are deformed. If the pars elongates, it is impossible to differentiate it by x-ray from the isthmic (type II b) Spondylolisthesis. If the pars separates, it becomes impossible to differentiate it by x-ray from the isthmic lytic (type II a) Spondylolisthesis. This type is also associated with sacral and neural arch deficiencies. It has a familial tendency.

Symptoms of Spondylosis - Degenerative Arthritis Treatment

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Spondylosis (Spine Arthritis) - PhysioWorks

Spondylolisthesis has been classified into grades I, II, III, IV and V depending on the severity of the displacement of the vertebra above on the vertebra below. In severe cases involving the lumbar spine, cauda equina syndrome can occur.

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Spondylosis treatment usually begins with a combination of conservative treatment options and this approach is usually effective in treating mild spondylosis.