Free plate tectonics papers, essays, and research papers.

The Great Mystery: Current Arguments

Energy and the Human Journey: Where We Have Been; …

Mass extinctions always have critical geophysical aspects to them, and often geochemical. Continental shelves under shallow seas, which are home to most marine life, are vulnerable to sea level and oceanic current changes. Stagnant waters, or waters that have too many nutrients dumped into them, can lose their oxygen, which triggers anoxic events that kill complex life. A continental shelf exposed to the atmosphere by a falling sea level would obviously lose its marine life, and that marine life might have had nowhere else to go. Sea levels can rise or fall for different reasons. The most obvious reason has been advancing and retreating ice sheets, as water is removed from or added to the oceans, but the aggregate continental landmass has always grown (possibly sporadically), continents can rise and can fall during the journeys of their tectonic plates, and the ocean’s collective basin has fluctuated in size, as water was hydrated into rocks, and also falling when and rising again as they fragmented. Generally, when , the continental shelves lost their marine life, and , anoxic conditions often accompanied them. There is evidence that the ozone layer has been periodically damaged, which stressed all plants and animals that the Sun directly shined on. The positions of the continents, both in relation to each other and their proximity to the equator or poles, can have dramatic effects, including impacts on global climate. Global climate changes and moving continents can turn rainforests into deserts and vice versa.

Human Knowledge: Foundations and Limits

SAMPLE LESSON PLANS IN SCIENCE I (Semi-detailed)

The culture’s killing implements abruptly appeared in the archeological record and disappeared just as fast, after the easily killable megafauna went extinct. Today’s North American megafauna are , not North American megafauna that learned to avoid humans. Bison are the only significant exception, although they came from Asia, too, and explaining their survival remains a minor curiosity, but is about the only circumstance not neatly aligned with the overkill scenario. The “” paper concluded that although the South American extinction was the greatest of all, it is the most poorly investigated and that the overkill hypothesis cannot yet be attached to South American extinctions. That may be a prudent position for a specialist who pronounces judgment only when all the evidence is in, but I will be among the most surprised people on Earth if the pattern of 50 thousand years did not continue there, especially since it had no ice sheets. There can be no more pertinent example than comparing Africa to South America. They inhabited the same latitudes and have similar climates, separated by the Atlantic Ocean. Africa was the home of humanity, where its animals had millions of years to adapt to the human presence, and Africa only lost about 10% of its megafauna (probably to human hunters with their advanced weaponry) while South America lost nearly all of its megafauna, and quickly. Climate change did it? How could it have even contributed?

Two major events happened soon after appeared, and their sequence seems to support the Cooking Hypotheses. The first of which was the migration of from Africa ; they spread to and by 1.8 mya (perhaps 1.6 mya in the case of Java), and . It was the , and may have become the first multi-continental member of the human line, and certainly the first widespread one. Favorable climates and a lower Himalaya range and Tibetan Plateau may have encouraged that migration. Unlike Miocene apes that began to migrate from Africa 16.5 mya, there was no unbroken forest to sustain journey to East Asia. Those migrants would have to sleep on the ground for much of the journey and were not adapted for sleeping in trees, . From today’s viewpoint, it may seem that they were adventurers, but as will also become obvious with the spread of , in one individual’s lifetime, there was probably only modest movement, expanding into the next uninhabited valley or two. Such an expansion happened one valley at a time, one generation at a time, to make it across a continent in a few thousand years for those that could adapt to changing biomes. Migrating at the same latitude would not have presented great climatic issues. As those migrations happened during the ice age, they were along southern Eurasia. There is no evidence yet that ever made it to Australia, probably because of the ocean crossing required for passage.


The Similarities of the Planets (and Other Celestial Objects)

For those who do not know much about the theory of plate tectonics; it states that there are twenty plates that cover most of the Earth's surface area....

How Good are those Young-Earth Arguments: Geologic …

Volcanism can not only temporarily alter the atmosphere’s chemistry, but the ash from volcanism can also block sunlight from reaching Earth’s surface and lead to atmospheric cooling. Carbon dioxide vented by volcanism in the Mesozoic era is . Tectonic plate movements can alter the circulation of the atmosphere and ocean. When continental plates come together into a supercontinent, oceanic currents can fail and the oceans can become anoxic, as atmospheric oxygen is no longer drawn into the global ocean’s depths, which may have . When continents are near the poles, , but in our current ice age the tipping point is , which is affected by, among other influences, the Moon.