Null and Alternative Hypothesis | Real Statistics Using Excel

Stated specifically, the theoretical F ratio of 2.34 allows us to reject the null hypothesis.

Given below are some of the terms used in hypothesis testing: 1

The F value should always be used along with the p value in deciding whether your results are significant enough to reject the null hypothesis. If you get a large f value (one that is bigger than the F critical value found in a table), it means something is , while a small p value means all your results are significant. The F statistic just compares the joint effect of all the together. To put it simply, reject the null hypothesis only if your alpha level is larger than your p value.

A Type I error is committed when one accepts the null hypothesis when it is false.

Alphas, P-Values, and Confidence Intervals, Oh My! | Minitab

In the figure above, I used the to calculate the probability of getting each possible number of males, from 0 to 48, under the null hypothesis that 0.5 are male. As you can see, the probability of getting 17 males out of 48 total chickens is about 0.015. That seems like a pretty small probability, doesn't it? However, that's the probability of getting exactly 17 males. What you want to know is the probability of getting 17 or fewer males. If you were going to accept 17 males as evidence that the sex ratio was biased, you would also have accepted 16, or 15, or 14,… males as evidence for a biased sex ratio. You therefore need to add together the probabilities of all these outcomes. The probability of getting 17 or fewer males out of 48, under the null hypothesis, is 0.030. That means that if you had an infinite number of chickens, half males and half females, and you took a bunch of random samples of 48 chickens, 3.0% of the samples would have 17 or fewer males.

We rather rejected the null hypothesis at 1st difference and accept the alternative hypothesis that the variables are all stationary.

Where this could get confusing is where one of these values seems to indicate that you should reject the null hypothesis and one of the values indicates you should not. For example, let’s say your One Way ANOVA has a p value of 0.68 and an of 0.05. As the p value is large, you should not However, your f value is 4.0 with an f critical value of 3.2. Should you now reject the null hypothesis? The answer is NO.

The null hypothesis of a unit root was accepted for all the other variables (except inflation) at level.

F Statistic / F Value: Definition and How to Run an F-Test

It is important to distinguish between biological null and alternative hypotheses and statistical null and alternative hypotheses. "Sexual selection by females has caused male chickens to evolve bigger feet than females" is a biological alternative hypothesis; it says something about biological processes, in this case sexual selection. "Male chickens have a different average foot size than females" is a statistical alternative hypothesis; it says something about the numbers, but nothing about what caused those numbers to be different. The biological null and alternative hypotheses are the first that you should think of, as they describe something interesting about biology; they are two possible answers to the biological question you are interested in ("What affects foot size in chickens?"). The statistical null and alternative hypotheses are statements about the data that should follow from the biological hypotheses: if sexual selection favors bigger feet in male chickens (a biological hypothesis), then the average foot size in male chickens should be larger than the average in females (a statistical hypothesis). If you reject the statistical null hypothesis, you then have to decide whether that's enough evidence that you can reject your biological null hypothesis. For example, if you don't find a significant difference in foot size between male and female chickens, you could conclude "There is no significant evidence that sexual selection has caused male chickens to have bigger feet." If you do find a statistically significant difference in foot size, that might not be enough for you to conclude that sexual selection caused the bigger feet; it might be that males eat more, or that the bigger feet are a developmental byproduct of the roosters' combs, or that males run around more and the exercise makes their feet bigger. When there are multiple biological interpretations of a statistical result, you need to think of additional experiments to test the different possibilities.

Hypothesis Testing - Six Sigma Material

This number, 0.030, is the P value. It is defined as the probability of getting the observed result, or a more extreme result, if the null hypothesis is true. So "P=0.030" is a shorthand way of saying "The probability of getting 17 or fewer male chickens out of 48 total chickens, IF the null hypothesis is true that 50% of chickens are male, is 0.030."