Epigenetic Developmental Origins Hypothesis and Oxidative Stress

Hypothesis Journal » Rewiring the stress response: A …

Developmental coordination disorder: A review and …

AB - This research tested the hypothesis that the transition through adolescence, particularly undergoing puberty early relative to one's peers, would amplify the effect of depression on the subsequent generation of interpersonal stress. This hypothesis was examined in 158 youth (M age = 12.39 years, SD = 1.21) using semistructured interviews of depression and life stress. Three indexes of development-chronological age, pubertal status, and pubertal timing-were examined as possible moderators of the stress-generation effect. As anticipated, depression predicted interpersonal stress generation in early-maturing but not late-maturing youth. These findings provide an important developmental context for theory and research on stress generation.

09/12/2017 · Cross-fostering alters advertisement vocalizations of grasshopper mice (Onychomys): Evidence for the developmental stress hypothesis. Physiol Behav.

Prenatal hormones and sexual orientation - Wikipedia

The present study investigated whether three specific indexes of development—chronological age, pubertal status (absolute level of maturation), and pubertal timing (level of maturation relative to one's peers)—moderated the interpersonal stress-generation process in depressed youth. It was hypothesized that pubertal timing would most likely amplify this process, such that depression would contribute more strongly to interpersonal stress generation in early-developing than in on-time or late-developing youth. Moreover, this study examined whether this amplification effect differed across sex. Research examining sex differences in the influence of puberty is mixed. Some research suggests that pubertal development confers social and emotional costs for girls but benefits for boys (; ). However, other research suggests that this transition contributes to difficulties in girls and boys (; ). Particularly relevant to the present study, both early-maturing girls and early-maturing boys experience more risky and challenging interpersonal contexts (for a review, see ). Thus, early maturation may intensify the adverse interpersonal effects of depression in both groups.

Developmental theories view adolescence, and particularly the pubertal transition, as a challenging stage of development during which youth face many normative disruptions and stressors within their relationships (; ; ). These interpersonal challenges are believed to be most salient when youth mature early relative to their peers. According to the stage-termination hypothesis (), early pubertal timing interrupts normative developmental trajectories, such that early-maturing youth are ill prepared to deal with the adolescent transition, and they lack the support structures enjoyed by on-time youth. Moreover, early-maturing youth tend to enter into more complex and potential risky relationships than do their peers (). Expanding on this hypothesis, proposed that early pubertal timing serves as a transitional stressor that accentuates preexisting individual differences in vulnerability. Thus, depressed youth may generate particularly high levels of stress in their relationships when faced with the social challenges of adolescence and the pubertal transition; moreover, this amplification effect may be magnified in early-maturing depressed youth. One recent study () revealed that the stress-generation effect of depression increased from early childhood through adolescence but did not elucidate whether this trend was due to chronological age or the progression through puberty.


Long-term Effects of Child Sexual Abuse by Paul E

This research tested the hypothesis that the transition through adolescence, particularly undergoing puberty early relative to one's peers, would amplify the effect of depression on the subsequent generation of interpersonal stress. This hypothesis was examined in 158 youth (M age = 12.39 years, SD = 1.21) using semistructured interviews of depression and life stress. Three indexes of development-chronological age, pubertal status, and pubertal timing-were examined as possible moderators of the stress-generation effect. As anticipated, depression predicted interpersonal stress generation in early-maturing but not late-maturing youth. These findings provide an important developmental context for theory and research on stress generation.

Preschool stress: What causes it, and how can we help …

N2 - This research tested the hypothesis that the transition through adolescence, particularly undergoing puberty early relative to one's peers, would amplify the effect of depression on the subsequent generation of interpersonal stress. This hypothesis was examined in 158 youth (M age = 12.39 years, SD = 1.21) using semistructured interviews of depression and life stress. Three indexes of development-chronological age, pubertal status, and pubertal timing-were examined as possible moderators of the stress-generation effect. As anticipated, depression predicted interpersonal stress generation in early-maturing but not late-maturing youth. These findings provide an important developmental context for theory and research on stress generation.