DO - 10.1016/0140-6736(92)90744-N

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Lovastatin (mevinolin) caused a strong and dose-dependent inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in six types of cultured human cells. Fifty percent inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in human enterocytes was observed at a lovastatin concentration of about 0.004 ng/ml and in other cells at a lovastatin concentration of about 0.03 ng/ml. At lovastatin concentrations between 1.0 and 100.0 ng/ml, a moderate tissue selectivity of lovastatin action was noted. At optimal concentrations, lovastatin inhibited cholesterol synthesis in hepatocytes by 98%, in normal and LDL-receptor negative fibroblasts, arterial smooth muscle cells and hepatoma G-2 cells by about 90%, and in enterocytes by 75%. In rat enterocytes lovastatin inhibited cholesterol synthesis by only 60%.

KW - Homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia

Patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (HoFH) have markedly elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels that are refractory to standard doses of lipid-lowering drug therapy. In the present study we evaluated the effect of atorvastatin on steady state concentrations of plasma lipids and mevalonic acid (MVA), as well as on 24-h urinary excretion of MVA in patients with well characterized HoFH. Thirty-five HoFH patients (18 males; 17 females) received 40 mg and then 80 mg atorvastatin/day. The dose of atorvastatin was increased further to 120 mg/day in 20 subjects and to 160 mg/day in 13 subjects who had not achieved LDL cholesterol goal, or in whom the dose of atorvastatin had not exceeded 2.5 mg/kg body wt per day. LDL cholesterol levels were reduced by 17% at the 40 mg/day and by 28% at the 80 mg/day dosage (P

Frederick J. Raal, , D. Roger Illingworth, Gillian J. Pilcher, A. David Marais, Jean C. Firth, Maritha J. Kotze, Therese M. Heinonen, Donald M. Black


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N2 - An important feature of malignant transformation is loss of the cholesterol feedback inhibition mechanism that regulates cholesterol synthesis. Cancer cells seem to require an increase in the concentrations of cholesterol and of cholesterol precursors. Therefore, a reasonable assumption is that prevention of tumour-cell growth can be achieved by restricting either cholesterol availability or cholesterol synthesis. In-vivo and cell-culture experiments have shown that lowering the plasma cholesterol concentration or intervening in the mevalonate pathway with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG) CoA reductase inhibitors decreases tumour growth. Currently prescribed doses of H MG-CoA reductase inhibitors given orally or continuously by an implantable infusion pump could achieve tumour therapeutic tissue concentrations of these agents. My hypothesis is that cholesterol inhibition can inhibit tumour cell growth, can act as an adjuvant to cancer chemotherapy, and, possibly, can prevent carcinogenesis.

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AB - Patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolaemia (HoFH) have markedly elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels that are refractory to standard doses of lipid-lowering drug therapy. In the present study we evaluated the effect of atorvastatin on steady state concentrations of plasma lipids and mevalonic acid (MVA), as well as on 24-h urinary excretion of MVA in patients with well characterized HoFH. Thirty-five HoFH patients (18 males; 17 females) received 40 mg and then 80 mg atorvastatin/day. The dose of atorvastatin was increased further to 120 mg/day in 20 subjects and to 160 mg/day in 13 subjects who had not achieved LDL cholesterol goal, or in whom the dose of atorvastatin had not exceeded 2.5 mg/kg body wt per day. LDL cholesterol levels were reduced by 17% at the 40 mg/day and by 28% at the 80 mg/day dosage (P

Amino acid synthesis - Wikipedia

An important feature of malignant transformation is loss of the cholesterol feedback inhibition mechanism that regulates cholesterol synthesis. Cancer cells seem to require an increase in the concentrations of cholesterol and of cholesterol precursors. Therefore, a reasonable assumption is that prevention of tumour-cell growth can be achieved by restricting either cholesterol availability or cholesterol synthesis. In-vivo and cell-culture experiments have shown that lowering the plasma cholesterol concentration or intervening in the mevalonate pathway with 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl (HMG) CoA reductase inhibitors decreases tumour growth. Currently prescribed doses of H MG-CoA reductase inhibitors given orally or continuously by an implantable infusion pump could achieve tumour therapeutic tissue concentrations of these agents. My hypothesis is that cholesterol inhibition can inhibit tumour cell growth, can act as an adjuvant to cancer chemotherapy, and, possibly, can prevent carcinogenesis.