Synthetic analogs of tetrahydrobiopterin with cofactor activity ..

involved in the synthesis of hemoglobin, melanin, ..

Glossary | Linus Pauling Institute | Oregon State University

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), also known as ubiquinone, is an endogenously produced lipid-soluble cofactor that has a significant role in the formation of energy within cells. It also serves as a potent antioxidant and is very effective in inhibiting the oxidation and modification of low density lipoproteins (LDLs). In addition to endogenous production, dietary sources and/or supplements provide CoQ10. Reflects the amount of CoQ10 present in serum.

Protein - definition of protein by The Free Dictionary

White Blood Cell (WBC): A low white blood cell count may result from bone marrow disorders, lymphoma and HIV. A high white blood cell count may result from infections, inflammation, leukemia, myeloproliferative neoplasms and allergic responses.

Red Blood Cell (RBC): Low levels of RBC may be seen in anemias, hemoglobinopathy, iron, vitamin B12 or folate deficiencies, bone marrow damage or disorders, chronic inflammatory diseases and kidney failure. Elevated RBC may be associated with dehydration, pulmonary disease, congenital heart disease, smoking, and polycythemia vera.

Hemoglobin: The hemoglobin test is often used to check for anemia, usually along with a hematocrit or as part of a complete blood count. Low hemoglobin level may be due blood loss, chronic kidney disease, bone marrow disorders or iron, folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin B6 deficiencies. A high hemoglobin level is most often caused by hypoxia, polycythemia vera, dehydration and smoking

Hematocrit: The hematocrit test is often used to check for anemia, usually along with a hemoglobin or as part of a complete blood count. Low hemoglobin level may be due blood loss, chronic kidney disease, bone marrow disorders or iron, folate, vitamin B12, and vitamin B6 deficiencies. A high hemoglobin level is most often caused by hypoxia, polycythemia vera, dehydration and smoking

MCV: A low MCV indicates microcytic RBCs which may be due to iron deficiency anemia or thalassemias. An elevated MCV indicates macrocytic RBCs which may be seen in anemia caused by vitamin B12 or folate deficiency, myelodysplasia, liver disease and hypothyroidism.

MCH: Mirrors MCV results.

MCHC: May be low when MCV is low; decreased MCHC values are seen in conditions such as iron deficiency anemia and thalassemia. Increased MCHC values are seen in autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in burn patients, and hereditary spherocytosis.

RDW: Increased RDW is believed to be closely associated with the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with previous myocardial infarction. A low value indicates uniformity in size of RBCs. A high value Indicates a mixed population of small and large RBC which can signify iron deficiency anemia or pernicious anemia.

Platelets:

A platelet count is part of a complete blood count and may be used to screen for or diagnose various diseases and conditions that can cause problems with clot formation. A low platelet count may be a results of bone marrow disorders. A high platelet count may be caused by cancer, anemia, chronic inflammatory diseases, oral contraceptives, myeloproliferative disorders.

Measures and reports the following:

White Blood Cell (WBC): White blood cells, or leukocytes, function as phagocytes of bacteria, fungi and viruses.

Red Blood Cell (RBC): Red blood cells, also called erythrocytes, are cells that circulate in the blood and carry oxygen throughout the body. A relatively stable number of red blood cells are maintained in the circulation by increasing or decreasing the rate of production by the bone marrow.

Hemoglobin: Hemoglobin is the iron-containing protein found in all red blood cells that enables them to bind to oxygen in the lungs and carry it to tissues and organs throughout the body.

Hematocrit: Hematocrit is a measurement of the proportion of the blood that is made up of red blood cells and is dependent on the number of and size of the red blood cells.

MCV: The mean red blood cell volume, mean corpuscular volume or MCV, is an evaluation of the average size of each red blood cell.

MCH: Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) is a calculation of the average amount of hemoglobin inside a single red blood cell.

MCHC: Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) is a calculation of the average amount of hemoglobin in the RBCs compared to the average size of the RBCs.

RDW: Red blood cell distribution width (RDW) is a numerical measure of the size variability of circulating red blood cells.

Platelets: Platelets are very small cells found in the blood and are essential for normal blood clotting.


How magnesium works - What magnesium does …

This test measures the concentration of glucose attached to the hemoglobin in red blood cells. It assesses the average amount of glucose in blood over the last two to three months.